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The feud between musicians Graham Nash and David Crosby of the iconic rock group Crosby, Still, Nash and Young is, by now, legendary among classic rock fans. In an interview last year, Nash said his former bandmate “tore the heart out” of CSNY. Fans’ hopes for another reunion never appeared so dim.

But now, with the election of President Donald Trump in November, Nash has indicated that he and his bandmates might be able to put their animosity for each other aside for the greater good — and their apparent mutual dislike of Trump.

“Here’s how I feel about it: I believe that the issues that are keeping us apart pale in comparison to the good that we can do if we get out there and start talking about what’s happening,” the 75-year-old told Variety in an interview this week.

“So I’d be totally up for it even though I’m not talking to David and neither is Neil. But I think that we’re smart people in the end and I think we realize the good that we can do,” he added.

Despite his problems with Crosby, the two apparently share similar politics. In an interview this month with the San Luis Obispo Tribune, Crosby called Trump “without question the worst president we have ever had.”

“He’s an idiot and a child and an asshole, and he’s brought a crew of rapists in with him to screw the economy every way they could and try to get more money for themselves,” Crosby said.

So it would hardly be a surprise if today’s political climate brought the group back together. The band’s repertoire includes such politically-charged songs as 2013’s “Almost Gone (The Ballad of Bradley Manning)” and the 1970 mega-hit “Ohio,” about the Kent State shootings during the Vietnam War.

Still, Nash’s comments represent an abrupt departure from what he said about Crosby in an interview last year with Dutch outlet Lust for Life. Nash said that Crosby had been “f*cking awful” to him over the past few years, and flatly said the group would never reunite.

“I’ve been there and saved his f*cking ass for 45 years, and he treated me like sh*t,” Nash said of former bandmate at the time. “You can’t do that to me. You can do it for a day or so, until I think you’re going to come around. But when it goes on longer, and I keep getting nasty emails from him, I’m done. F*ck you.”

But the election of Trump has apparently changed all that. Nash told Variety that today’s activists must remain “really vigilant and strong” in an uncertain political climate.

“We cannot let this man undermine everything we have fought for over the last 30 years, which is what’s happening by the way,” he said. “You couldn’t possibly write this script and have it accepted in Hollywood, they would laugh you out of the office. ‘Then this guy becomes president and did what?’ It’s a crazy story.”

Read Nash’s full interview with Variety here.

Follow Daniel Nussbaum on Twitter: @dznussbaum

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